Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

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Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs; Breast cancer is a life threatening disease. The key to surviving it is early detection. Examine your self today.

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Breast cancer is also known to be a kind of cancer that develops from breast cells. Breast cancer usually starts off in the inner lining of milk ducts or the lobules that supply them with milk. A malignant tumor can spread to other parts of the body. A breast cancer that started off in the lobules is known as lobular carcinoma, while one that developed from the ducts is called ductal carcinoma.

The vast majority of breast cancer cases occur in females. This article focuses on breast cancer in women. We also have an article about male breast cancer.

Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in females worldwide. It accounts for 16% of all female cancers and 22.9% of invasive cancers in women. 18.2% of all cancer deaths worldwide, including both males and females, are from breast cancer.

Breast cancer rates are much higher in developed nations compared to developing ones. There are several reasons for this, with possibly life-expectancy being one of the key factors – breast cancer is more common in elderly women; women in the richest countries live much longer than those in the poorest nations. The different lifestyles and eating habits of females in rich and poor countries are also contributory factors, experts believe.

According to the National Cancer Institute, 232,340 female breast cancers and 2,240 male breast cancers are reported in the USA each year, as well as about 39,620 deaths caused by the disease.

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Types of Breast Cancer

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Breast cancer can begin in different areas of the breast — the ducts, the lobules, or in some cases, the tissue in between. In this section, you will find the list of the different types of breast cancer, including non-invasive, invasive, recurrent, and metastatic breast cancers, as well as the intrinsic or molecular subtypes of breast cancer. You can also find about breast cancer in men.

  • DCIS — Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
  • IDC — Invasive Ductal Carcinoma
  • IDC Type: Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast
  • IDC Type: Medullary Carcinoma of the Breast
  • IDC Type: Mucinous Carcinoma of the Breast
  • IDC Type: Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast
  • IDC Type: Cribriform Carcinoma of the Breast
  • ILC — Invasive Lobular Carcinoma
  • Inflammatory Breast Cancer
  • LCIS — Lobular Carcinoma In Situ
  • Male Breast Cancer
  • Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer
  • Paget’s Disease of the Nipple
  • Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast
  • Recurrent & Metastatic Breast Cancer

ALSO READ: HOW TO NATURALLY PREVENT AND IMPROVE THE TREATMENT OF TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER 

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Causes of Breast Cancer

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

It’s not clear what causes breast cancer.

Doctors know that breast cancer occurs when some breast cells begin growing abnormally. These cells divide more rapidly than healthy cells do and continue to accumulate, forming a lump or mass. The cells may spread (metastasize) through your breast to your lymph nodes or to other parts of your body.

Breast cancer most often begins with cells in the milk-producing ducts (invasive ductal carcinoma). Breast cancer may also begin in the glandular tissue called lobules (invasive lobular carcinoma) or in other cells or tissue within the breast.

Researchers have identified hormonal, lifestyle and environmental factors that may increase your risk of breast cancer. But it’s not clear why some people who have no risk factors develop cancer, yet other people with risk factors never do. It’s likely that breast cancer is caused by a complex interaction of your genetic makeup and your environment.

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Breast cancer from inheritance

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Doctors estimate that about 5 to 10 percent of breast cancers are linked to gene mutations passed through generations of a family.

A number of inherited mutated genes that can increase the likelihood of breast cancer have been identified. The most common are breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer gene 2 (BRCA2), both of which significantly increase the risk of both breast and ovarian cancer.

If you have a strong family history of breast cancer or other cancers, your doctor may recommend a blood test to help identify specific mutations in BRCA or other genes that are being passed through your family.

Consider asking your doctor for a referral to a genetic counselor, who can review your family health history. A genetic counselor can also discuss the benefits, risks and limitations of genetic testing with you and guide you on appropriate genetic testing.

 

Risk factors associated with breast cancer

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

A breast cancer risk factor is anything that makes it more likely you’ll get breast cancer. But having one or even several breast cancer risk factors doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll develop breast cancer. Many women who develop breast cancer have no known risk factors other than simply being women.

Factors that are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer include:

  • Being female. Women are much more likely than men are to develop breast cancer.
  • Increasing age. Your risk of breast cancer increases as you age.
  • A personal history of breast cancer. If you’ve had breast cancer in one breast, you have an increased risk of developing cancer in the other breast.
  • A family history of breast cancer. If your mother, sister or daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer, particularly at a young age, your risk of breast cancer is increased. Still, the majority of people diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history of the disease.
  • Inherited genes that increase cancer risk. Certain gene mutations that increase the risk of breast cancer can be passed from parents to children. The most common gene mutations are referred to as BRCA1 and BRCA2. These genes can greatly increase your risk of breast cancer and other cancers, but they don’t make cancer inevitable.
  • Radiation exposure. If you received radiation treatments to your chest as a child or young adult, your risk of breast cancer is increased.
  • Obesity. Being obese increases your risk of breast cancer.
  • Beginning your period at a younger age. Beginning your period before age 12 increases your risk of breast cancer.
  • Beginning menopause at an older age. If you began menopause at an older age, you’re more likely to develop breast cancer.
  • Having your first child at an older age. Women who give birth to their first child after age 30 may have an increased risk of breast cancer.
  • Having never been pregnant. Women who have never been pregnant have a greater risk of breast cancer than do women who have had one or more pregnancies.
  • Postmenopausal hormone therapy. Women who take hormone therapy medications that combine estrogen and progesterone to treat the signs and symptoms of menopause have an increased risk of breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer decreases when women stop taking these medications.
  • Drinking alcohol. Drinking alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer.

 

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Signs and Symptoms of breast cancer

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

A symptom is only felt by the patient, and is described to the doctor or nurse, such as a headache or pain. A sign is something the patient and others can detect, for example, a rash or swelling.

The first symptoms of breast cancer are usually an area of thickened tissue in the woman’s breast, or a lump. The majority of lumps are not cancerous; however, women should get them checked by a health care professional.

Women who detect any of the following signs or symptoms should tell their doctor:

  • A lump in a breast
  • A pain in the armpits or breast that does not seem to be related to the woman’s menstrual period
  • Pitting or redness of the skin of the breast; like the skin of an orange
  • A rash around (or on) one of the nipples
  • A swelling (lump) in one of the armpits
  • An area of thickened tissue in a breast
  • One of the nipples has a discharge; sometimes it may contain blood
  • The nipple changes in appearance; it may become sunken or inverted
  • The size or the shape of the breast changes
  • The nipple-skin or breast-skin may have started to peel, scale or flake.

How to prevent breast cancer

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

In addition to the major ways of finding out family history of breast cancer and regular screening or examination of one self, other ways of preventing breast cancer include: 

1. Keep Weight in Check

It’s easy to tune out because it gets said so often, but maintaining a healthy weight is an important goal for everyone. Being overweight can increase the risk of many different cancers, including breast cancer, especially after menopause.

2. Be Physically Active

Exercise is as close to a silver bullet for good health as there is, and women who are physically active for at least 30 minutes a day have a lower risk of breast cancer. Regular exercise is also one of the best ways to help keep weight in check.

3. Eat Your Fruits & Vegetables – and Avoid Too Much Alcohol

A healthy diet can help lower the risk of breast cancer.  Try to eat a lot of fruits and vegetables and keep alcohol at moderate levels or lower (a drink a day or under).  While moderate drinking can be good for the heart in older adults, even low levels of intake can increase the risk of breast cancer.  If you don’t drink, don’t feel you need to start. If you drink moderately, there’s likely no reason to stop. But, if you drink more, you should cut down or quit.

4. Don’t Smoke

Smokers and non-smokers alike know how unhealthy smoking is.  On top of lowering quality of life and increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke, and at least 15 cancers – including breast cancer – it also causes smelly breath, bad teeth, and wrinkles. Now that’s motivation to stay smoke-free or work to get smoke-free.

5. Breastfeed, If Possible

Breastfeeding for a total of one year or more (combined for all children) lowers the risk of breast cancer. It also has great health benefits for the child.

6. Avoid Birth Control Pills, Particularly After Age 35 or If You Smoke

Birth control pills have both risks and benefits. The younger a woman is, the lower the risks are. While women are taking birth control pills, they have a slightly increased risk of breast cancer. This risk goes away quickly, though, after stopping the pill. The risk of stroke and heart attack is also increased while on the pill – particularly if a woman smokes. However, long-term use can also have important benefits, like lowering the risk of ovarian cancer, colon cancer and uterine cancer – not to mention unwanted pregnancy – so there’s also a lot in its favor. If you’re very concerned about breast cancer, avoiding birth control pills is one option to lower risk.

7. Avoid Post-Menopausal Hormones

Post-menopausal hormones shouldn’t be taken long term to prevent chronic diseases, like osteoporosis and heart disease. Studies show they have a mixed effect on health, increasing the risk of some diseases and lowering the risk of others, and both estrogenonly hormones and estrogen-plus-progestin hormones increase the risk of breast cancer. If women do take post-menopausal hormones, it should be for the shortest time possible. The best person to talk to about the risks and benefits of post-menopausal hormones is your doctor.

8. Tamoxifen and Raloxifene for Women at High Risk

Although not commonly thought of as a “healthy
behavior,” taking the prescription drugs tamoxifen
and raloxifene can significantly lower the risk of
breast cancer in woman at high risk of the disease.
Approved by the FDA for breast cancer prevention,
these powerful drugs can have side effects, so
they aren’t right for everyone. If you think you’re
at high risk, talk to your doctor to see if tamoxifen or raloxifene may be right for you.

RECOMMENDED: THE POWER OF CARROT IN REDUCING BREAST CANCER RISK 

Prevent the Deadly Breast Cancer by Regularly Checking for These Signs

Final Thoughts 

Breast cancer is known to be a kind of cancer that develops from breast cells.

Breast cancer is a life threatening disease. The key to surviving it is early detection. Examine your self today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources and References:

 

http://www.breastcancer.org/

American Cancer Society. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2015-2016, 2015.

Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al., editors. SEER Fast Stats, 1975-2013. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. http://seer.cancer.gov/faststats/, 2016.

https://www.cancer.org/

Lobbezoo DJ, van Kampen RJ, Voogd AC, et al. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer: are there differences between patients with de novo and recurrent metastatic breast cancer? Br J Cancer. 112(9):1445-51, 2015.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/

 

 

 

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